What to do when
someone dies

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Feel free to call us anytime, for whatever reason

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Following a death, certain practical steps need to be taken at an early stage, normally when family and close friends are suffering from shock and emotional stress. Therefore, the professional guidance and advice that we, as Funeral Directors, can offer is often a comfort, which is available 24 hours a day.

Hidden

At Home, in a Nursing Home or a Cottage Hospital

If someone dies at home, this will usually be confirmed by a qualified professional, i.e. a GP, on-call Doctor, Paramedic or Qualified Nurse. Once the death has been confirmed, the family may contact us to arrange for their loved one to be taken into our care. Sometime later, the deceased’s GP will issue the Medical Certificate that states the cause of death. This is the certificate that needs to go to the Registrar (see Registering a Death).

The same applies if the death occurs at a nursing home, although the nursing home would normally contact us direct once the death is confirmed.

In the case of a small cottage/local hospital, the same applies regarding confirmation of death etc, the only difference being, the hospital have an arrangement with a local funeral director to look after the deceased until the paperwork is complete. The family then have a choice of which funeral director to use.

If the Coroner is involved

The majority of deaths notified to the Coroner are completely natural but the cause of death is not certain. The following deaths would be reported to the Coroner.

  • Where the cause of death is unknown or unexpected.
  • Where the cause of death is believed to be unnatural or suspicious.
  • Where the death occurred during an operation.
  • Where the death occurred due to an industrial disease.
  • Where the death is due to an accident.

Usually, someone from the Coroner’s Office will speak to a near relative or their representative, as well as any doctors who have been looking after the deceased before deciding if a Post- Mortem is necessary. The purpose of this examination is to determine the cause of death and is not done for research or any other purpose.

If the cause of death is found to be natural and there are no other circumstances requiring an Inquest, the Coroner will provide a document allowing the death to be registered.

If the death was not due to natural causes and further tests are needed to find the cause of death, the Coroner will open an Inquest. They will usually release the deceased at this stage and allow the funeral to go ahead.

Registering a death

A death must be registered within 5 days of it’s occurrence. This period may be extended in exceptional circumstances and
if the Coroner is involved. The registration must take place in the district where the death happened.

Who can register a death?

  • A relative of the deceased
  • Someone present at the death
  • The occupier of the premises where the death occurred
  • Another person living at the house, if he or she knew of the death
  • The person making the arrangements with the funeral directors

Information will you need

You will be asked the following information:

  • Date and place of death
  • Name and surname of the deceased and any other names he/she have been known by Maiden surname (for married women)
  • Date and place of birth
  • Last occupation
  • Name and occupation of spouse or civil partner
  • Usual address
  • Whether the deceased was in receipt of a pension or allowance from public funds
  • If the deceased was married or in a civil partnership, the date of birth of the surviving widow/widower/civil partner

You will need to take the medical certificate issued by the doctor, stating the cause of death.
The deceased person’s:

  • Passport
  • Medical card
  • Proof of address (e.g. utility bill)
  • All marriage/civil partnership certificates
  • Birth certificate
  • Deed poll or statutory declaration if appropriate

Your:

  • Passport
  • Driving licence if held
  • Proof of address (e.g. utility bill)

The absence of supporting documents will not prevent registration.

The registrar will issue a certificate for burial or cremation, in some cases a document may be issued by the coroner. This is normally passed to the funeral director by the relative making the arrangements. A certificate for sending to the Department of Social Security will also be issued by the registrar. The form gives details of the death and an application for applicable claims.

Where the coroner is involved a different procedure may apply.

Death certificates

After a death has been registered, one or more certificates may be bought at the same time of registration at a cost of £11 each. If copies of the death certificate are required after the registration we can advise you on the fees.

You will need these copies for banks, insurance companies etc, and to administer the estate of the person who has died.

Tell Us Once service

When someone has died the Tell us Once service can help you tell the people who need to know. There are lots of things that need to be done, at a time when you probably least feel like doing them. One of these is contacting government departments and local council services that need to be told.

When you make an appointment to register the death we will give you more information about the Tell us Once service and how you can use it. The service is usually provided at the same time as registering the death.

In Hospital

If someone dies in a large hospital the family will probably have to wait for administrative staff to contact them with an appointment to collect the Medical Certificate, they can also sometimes help with booking an appointment at the Registrars.

It is usual for the deceased to remain at the hospital while this is taking place. Once the paperwork is complete, we would then go to the hospital to collect the deceased.

In all of the above circumstances, the Funeral Director would arrange for completion of Forms 4 and 5 if cremation is requested.

If the Coroner is involved

The majority of deaths notified to the Coroner are completely natural but the cause of death is not certain. The following deaths would be reported to the Coroner.

  • Where the cause of death is unknown or unexpected.
  • Where the cause of death is believed to be unnatural or suspicious.
  • Where the death occurred during an operation.
  • Where the death occurred due to an industrial disease.
  • Where the death is due to an accident.

Usually, someone from the Coroner’s Office will speak to a near relative or their representative, as well as any doctors who have been looking after the deceased before deciding if a Post- Mortem is necessary. The purpose of this examination is to determine the cause of death and is not done for research or any other purpose.

If the cause of death is found to be natural and there are no other circumstances requiring an Inquest, the Coroner will provide a document allowing the death to be registered.

If the death was not due to natural causes and further tests are needed to find the cause of death, the Coroner will open an Inquest. They will usually release the deceased at this stage and allow the funeral to go ahead.

Registering a death

A death must be registered within 5 days of it’s occurrence. This period may be extended in exceptional circumstances and
if the Coroner is involved. The registration must take place in the district where the death happened.

Who can register a death?

  • A relative of the deceased
  • Someone present at the death
  • The occupier of the premises where the death occurred
  • Another person living at the house, if he or she knew of the death
  • The person making the arrangements with the funeral directors

Information will you need

You will be asked the following information:

  • Date and place of death
  • Name and surname of the deceased and any other names he/she have been known by Maiden surname (for married women)
  • Date and place of birth
  • Last occupation
  • Name and occupation of spouse or civil partner
  • Usual address
  • Whether the deceased was in receipt of a pension or allowance from public funds
  • If the deceased was married or in a civil partnership, the date of birth of the surviving widow/widower/civil partner

You will need to take the medical certificate issued by the doctor, stating the cause of death.
The deceased person’s:

  • Passport
  • Medical card
  • Proof of address (e.g. utility bill)
  • All marriage/civil partnership certificates
  • Birth certificate
  • Deed poll or statutory declaration if appropriate

Your:

  • Passport
  • Driving licence if held
  • Proof of address (e.g. utility bill)

The absence of supporting documents will not prevent registration.

The registrar will issue a certificate for burial or cremation, in some cases a document may be issued by the coroner. This is normally passed to the funeral director by the relative making the arrangements. A certificate for sending to the Department of Social Security will also be issued by the registrar. The form gives details of the death and an application for applicable claims.

Where the coroner is involved a different procedure may apply.

Death certificates

After a death has been registered, one or more certificates may be bought at the same time of registration at a cost of £11 each. If copies of the death certificate are required after the registration we can advise you on the fees.

You will need these copies for banks, insurance companies etc, and to administer the estate of the person who has died.

Tell Us Once service

When someone has died the Tell us Once service can help you tell the people who need to know. There are lots of things that need to be done, at a time when you probably least feel like doing them. One of these is contacting government departments and local council services that need to be told.

When you make an appointment to register the death we will give you more information about the Tell us Once service and how you can use it. The service is usually provided at the same time as registering the death.

 

Registration Offices

Here you can find details of Derbyshire Registration Offices (also known as Register or Registry Offices).

Opening hours for registrations of death are correct to the best of our knowledge. It is essential that you make an appointment before visiting any of the following registration offices.

If you are uncertain about anything, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

Ashbourne

Bakewell

Buxton

Ashbourne Library
2 Compton
Ashbourne
DE6 1DA
Town Hall
Bakewell
DE45 1BW
Town Hall
Market Place
Buxton
SK17 6EL
T: 01629 533968 T: 01629 535261 T: (01629) 535075
Opening Times Opening Times Opening Times
Monday and Wednesday: 10am – 12:30pm
Friday: 1.30pm – 4pm
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 9.00am – 12.45pm Monday & Wednesday 9.00am – 2.00pm
Friday 9.00am – 1.00pm
(By appointment only);

 

Chesterfield

Derby

Glossop

Chesterfield Town Hall
Chesterfield
S40 1LP
Customer Service Centre
The Council House
Corporation Street
Derby,
DE1 2FS
Municipal Buildings
Glossop
Derbyshire
SK13 8AF
T: 01629 533110/533111/533112 T: 01332 641680 T: 01629 531503
Opening Times Opening Times Opening Times
Monday – Friday: 9am – 4:30pm

Monday to Friday 9.00am – 5.00pm

 
Monday, Tuesday & Thursday 8.30pm – 2.00pm

 

Macclesfield

Matlock

New Mills

Town Hall Extension
Market Place
Macclesfield
SK10 1EA
Town Hall
Matlock
DE4 3NN
Town Hall
New Mils
High Peak
SK22 4AT
T: 0300 123 5019 T: (01629) 582870 T: 01629 533686
Opening Times Opening Times Opening Times
Monday to Friday 9am – 4.30pm Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
1.30pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday (By appointment only) 2.30pm – 4.30pm

 

Ripley

Royal Derby Hospital

Sheffield

Town Hall
Market Place
Ripley
DE5 3BT
Uttoxeter New Road
Derby
DE22 3NE
Town Hall
Pinstone St
S1 2HH
T: 01629 532609 T: 01332 785557 T: (0144) 2039427
Opening Times Opening Times Opening Times
Monday to Friday 9.00am -1.00pm and 1.30pm to 4.00pm Monday to Friday 9.45am – 3.45pm Monday – Thursday: 8.45am – 5.15pm
Friday: 8.45am – 4.45pm

 

Stockport

Stoke-on-Trent

 
Town Hall
John Street
Stockport
SK1 3XE
The Civic Centre
Glebe Street
Stoke on Trent
ST4 1HH
 
T: 0161 217 6007 T: 01782 235260  
Opening Times Opening Times  
Monday to Friday 8.30am – 4.30pm Monday – Thursday: 9.00am – 5.00pm
Friday: 9.00am – 4.30pm
 

Probate

The majority of people choose to use professional help to deal with the legal formalities required to administer an estate. There is far more involved than just filing in one or two forms and obtaining the grant of probate (see below). You have a choice of types of professional service. As with all professional services for which you will be charged (but in this case the fees are deducted from the estate) do ask as many questions as you need to about price structures and how the service will be provided.

A grant of probate is a court order that allows the executor of a will or their professional representative to deal with the property and financial affairs of the deceased. However, when most people use the word ‘probate’ they mean the whole process of discovering what someone has left, going through the legal process of gaining authority to deal with it (whether there is a will or not), paying off any debts and finally distributing the remainder to the people entitled to receive it. This is the administration of the estate, which can take several months and up to a year or more depending on the complexity and whether a property is involved.

Probate is very similar wether there is a will or not

Whether you need probate depends on the value of the estate. An asset holder (e.g. a bank) can insist that a grant be obtained for any amount over £5000 although many have a higher threshold. They are not being difficult – this is the procedure laid down in law to ensure the wishes of the deceased are carried out, creditors are paid and that the people named as beneficiaries do receive their entitlement.

There are choices available to you if you are asked by a bank or other asset holder for probate. Remember it is the executor who must formally make the decision how to do this or the nearest relative if there is no will. Many high street solicitors provide probate services and we can find a solicitor for you.

Banks carry out probate but often only do this for existing customers who have appointed the bank as executor.

It is possible to deal with probate yourself although we would only recommend this if the estate is simple or you have relevant experience.

Hidden

At Home, in a Nursing Home or a Cottage Hospital

If someone dies at home, this will usually be confirmed by a qualified professional, i.e. a GP, on-call Doctor, Paramedic or Qualified Nurse. Once the death has been confirmed, the family may contact us to arrange for their loved one to be taken into our care. Sometime later, the deceased’s GP will issue the Medical Certificate that states the cause of death. This is the certificate that needs to go to the Registrar (see Registering a Death).

The same applies if the death occurs at a nursing home, although the nursing home would normally contact us direct once the death is confirmed.

In the case of a small cottage/local hospital, the same applies regarding confirmation of death etc, the only difference being, the hospital have an arrangement with a local funeral director to look after the deceased until the paperwork is complete. The family then have a choice of which funeral director to use.

If the Coroner is involved

The majority of deaths notified to the Coroner are completely natural but the cause of death is not certain. The following deaths would be reported to the Coroner.

  • Where the cause of death is unknown or unexpected.
  • Where the cause of death is believed to be unnatural or suspicious.
  • Where the death occurred during an operation.
  • Where the death occurred due to an industrial disease.
  • Where the death is due to an accident.

Usually, someone from the Coroner’s Office will speak to a near relative or their representative, as well as any doctors who have been looking after the deceased before deciding if a Post- Mortem is necessary. The purpose of this examination is to determine the cause of death and is not done for research or any other purpose.

If the cause of death is found to be natural and there are no other circumstances requiring an Inquest, the Coroner will provide a document allowing the death to be registered.

If the death was not due to natural causes and further tests are needed to find the cause of death, the Coroner will open an Inquest. They will usually release the deceased at this stage and allow the funeral to go ahead.

Registering a death

A death must be registered within 5 days of it’s occurrence. This period may be extended in exceptional circumstances and
if the Coroner is involved. The registration must take place in the district where the death happened.

Who can register a death?

  • A relative of the deceased
  • Someone present at the death
  • The occupier of the premises where the death occurred
  • Another person living at the house, if he or she knew of the death
  • The person making the arrangements with the funeral directors

Information will you need

You will be asked the following information:

  • Date and place of death
  • Name and surname of the deceased and any other names he/she have been known by Maiden surname (for married women)
  • Date and place of birth
  • Last occupation
  • Name and occupation of spouse or civil partner
  • Usual address
  • Whether the deceased was in receipt of a pension or allowance from public funds
  • If the deceased was married or in a civil partnership, the date of birth of the surviving widow/widower/civil partner

You will need to take the medical certificate issued by the doctor, stating the cause of death.
The deceased person’s:

  • Passport
  • Medical card
  • Proof of address (e.g. utility bill)
  • All marriage/civil partnership certificates
  • Birth certificate
  • Deed poll or statutory declaration if appropriate

Your:

  • Passport
  • Driving licence if held
  • Proof of address (e.g. utility bill)

The absence of supporting documents will not prevent registration.

The registrar will issue a certificate for burial or cremation, in some cases a document may be issued by the coroner. This is normally passed to the funeral director by the relative making the arrangements. A certificate for sending to the Department of Social Security will also be issued by the registrar. The form gives details of the death and an application for applicable claims.

Where the coroner is involved a different procedure may apply.

Death certificates

After a death has been registered, one or more certificates may be bought at the same time of registration at a cost of £11 each. If copies of the death certificate are required after the registration we can advise you on the fees.

You will need these copies for banks, insurance companies etc, and to administer the estate of the person who has died.

Tell Us Once service

When someone has died the Tell us Once service can help you tell the people who need to know. There are lots of things that need to be done, at a time when you probably least feel like doing them. One of these is contacting government departments and local council services that need to be told.

When you make an appointment to register the death we will give you more information about the Tell us Once service and how you can use it. The service is usually provided at the same time as registering the death.

In Hospital

If someone dies in a large hospital the family will probably have to wait for administrative staff to contact them with an appointment to collect the Medical Certificate, they can also sometimes help with booking an appointment at the Registrars.

It is usual for the deceased to remain at the hospital while this is taking place. Once the paperwork is complete, we would then go to the hospital to collect the deceased.

In all of the above circumstances, the Funeral Director would arrange for completion of Forms 4 and 5 if cremation is requested.

If the Coroner is involved

The majority of deaths notified to the Coroner are completely natural but the cause of death is not certain. The following deaths would be reported to the Coroner.

  • Where the cause of death is unknown or unexpected.
  • Where the cause of death is believed to be unnatural or suspicious.
  • Where the death occurred during an operation.
  • Where the death occurred due to an industrial disease.
  • Where the death is due to an accident.

Usually, someone from the Coroner’s Office will speak to a near relative or their representative, as well as any doctors who have been looking after the deceased before deciding if a Post- Mortem is necessary. The purpose of this examination is to determine the cause of death and is not done for research or any other purpose.

If the cause of death is found to be natural and there are no other circumstances requiring an Inquest, the Coroner will provide a document allowing the death to be registered.

If the death was not due to natural causes and further tests are needed to find the cause of death, the Coroner will open an Inquest. They will usually release the deceased at this stage and allow the funeral to go ahead.

Registering a death

A death must be registered within 5 days of it’s occurrence. This period may be extended in exceptional circumstances and
if the Coroner is involved. The registration must take place in the district where the death happened.

Who can register a death?

  • A relative of the deceased
  • Someone present at the death
  • The occupier of the premises where the death occurred
  • Another person living at the house, if he or she knew of the death
  • The person making the arrangements with the funeral directors

Information will you need

You will be asked the following information:

  • Date and place of death
  • Name and surname of the deceased and any other names he/she have been known by Maiden surname (for married women)
  • Date and place of birth
  • Last occupation
  • Name and occupation of spouse or civil partner
  • Usual address
  • Whether the deceased was in receipt of a pension or allowance from public funds
  • If the deceased was married or in a civil partnership, the date of birth of the surviving widow/widower/civil partner

You will need to take the medical certificate issued by the doctor, stating the cause of death.
The deceased person’s:

  • Passport
  • Medical card
  • Proof of address (e.g. utility bill)
  • All marriage/civil partnership certificates
  • Birth certificate
  • Deed poll or statutory declaration if appropriate

Your:

  • Passport
  • Driving licence if held
  • Proof of address (e.g. utility bill)

The absence of supporting documents will not prevent registration.

The registrar will issue a certificate for burial or cremation, in some cases a document may be issued by the coroner. This is normally passed to the funeral director by the relative making the arrangements. A certificate for sending to the Department of Social Security will also be issued by the registrar. The form gives details of the death and an application for applicable claims.

Where the coroner is involved a different procedure may apply.

Death certificates

After a death has been registered, one or more certificates may be bought at the same time of registration at a cost of £11 each. If copies of the death certificate are required after the registration we can advise you on the fees.

You will need these copies for banks, insurance companies etc, and to administer the estate of the person who has died.

Tell Us Once service

When someone has died the Tell us Once service can help you tell the people who need to know. There are lots of things that need to be done, at a time when you probably least feel like doing them. One of these is contacting government departments and local council services that need to be told.

When you make an appointment to register the death we will give you more information about the Tell us Once service and how you can use it. The service is usually provided at the same time as registering the death.

 

Registration Offices

Here you can find details of Derbyshire Registration Offices (also known as Register or Registry Offices).

Opening hours for registrations of death are correct to the best of our knowledge. It is essential that you make an appointment before visiting any of the following registration offices.

If you are uncertain about anything, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

 

Ashbourne

Bakewell

Buxton

Ashbourne Library
2 Compton
Ashbourne
DE6 1DA
Town Hall
Bakewell
DE45 1BW
Town Hall
Market Place
Buxton
SK17 6EL
T: 01629 533968 T: 01629 535261 T: (01629) 535075
Opening Times Opening Times Opening Times
Monday and Wednesday: 10am – 12:30pm
Friday: 1.30pm – 4pm
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday 9.00am – 12.45pm Monday & Wednesday 9.00am – 2.00pm
Friday 9.00am – 1.00pm
(By appointment only);

 

Chesterfield

Derby

Glossop

Chesterfield Town Hall
Chesterfield
S40 1LP
Customer Service Centre
The Council House
Corporation Street
Derby,
DE1 2FS
Municipal Buildings
Glossop
Derbyshire
SK13 8AF
T: 01629 533110/533111/533112 T: 01332 641680 T: 01629 531503
Opening Times Opening Times Opening Times
Monday – Friday: 9am – 4:30pm

Monday to Friday 9.00am – 5.00pm

Monday, Tuesday & Thursday 8.30pm – 2.00pm

 

Macclesfield

Matlock

New Mills

Town Hall Extension
Market Place
Macclesfield
SK10 1EA
Town Hall
Matlock
DE4 3NN
Town Hall
New Mils
High Peak
SK22 4AT
T: 0300 123 5019 T: (01629) 582870 T: 01629 533686
Opening Times Opening Times Opening Times
Monday to Friday 9am – 4.30pm Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
1.30pm – 4.30pm
Tuesday (By appointment only) 2.30pm – 4.30pm

 

Ripley

Royal Derby Hospital

Sheffield

Town Hall
Market Place
Ripley
DE5 3BT
Uttoxeter New Road
Derby
DE22 3NE
Town Hall
Pinstone St
S1 2HH
T: 01629 532609 T: 01332 785557 T: (0144) 2039427
Opening Times Opening Times Opening Times
Monday to Friday 9.00am -1.00pm and 1.30pm to 4.00pm Monday to Friday 9.45am – 3.45pm Monday – Thursday: 8.45am – 5.15pm
Friday: 8.45am – 4.45pm

 

Stockport

Town Hall
John Street
Stockport
SK1 3XE
T: 0161 217 6007
Opening Times
Monday to Friday 8.30am – 4.30pm

Probate

The majority of people choose to use professional help to deal with the legal formalities required to administer an estate. There is far more involved than just filing in one or two forms and obtaining the grant of probate (see below). You have a choice of types of professional service. As with all professional services for which you will be charged (but in this case the fees are deducted from the estate) do ask as many questions as you need to about price structures and how the service will be provided.

A grant of probate is a court order that allows the executor of a will or their professional representative to deal with the property and financial affairs of the deceased. However, when most people use the word ‘probate’ they mean the whole process of discovering what someone has left, going through the legal process of gaining authority to deal with it (whether there is a will or not), paying off any debts and finally distributing the remainder to the people entitled to receive it. This is the administration of the estate, which can take several months and up to a year or more depending on the complexity and whether a property is involved.

Probate is very similar wether there is a will or not

Whether you need probate depends on the value of the estate. An asset holder (e.g. a bank) can insist that a grant be obtained for any amount over £5000 although many have a higher threshold. They are not being difficult – this is the procedure laid down in law to ensure the wishes of the deceased are carried out, creditors are paid and that the people named as beneficiaries do receive their entitlement.

There are choices available to you if you are asked by a bank or other asset holder for probate. Remember it is the executor who must formally make the decision how to do this or the nearest relative if there is no will. Many high street solicitors provide probate services and we can find a solicitor for you.

Banks carry out probate but often only do this for existing customers who have appointed the bank as executor.

It is possible to deal with probate yourself although we would only recommend this if the estate is simple or you have relevant experience.

tombstone icon

Arranging a funeral

If you need to arrange a funeral, we’ll listen and guide you to help create a send-off most fitting for the person who has died. Whether that’s a simpler funeral or something more unique, we’ll be with you for every step to make it happen.

tombstone icon

Arranging a funeral

If you need to arrange a funeral, we’ll listen and guide you to help create a send-off most fitting for the person who has died. Whether that’s a simpler funeral or something more unique, we’ll be with you for every step to make it happen.

photo album

Testimonials

What our families say

“I’d just like to say a big heartfelt thank you to each and every one of you regarding the funeral of my mum. The dignity and respect shown was heart-warming. From bowing to my mum, to the horses and their perfect plumes and also the video tribute was beautiful. All in all it was absolutely perfect and dignified from start to finish.”

Testimonials

What our families say

“I’d just like to say a big heartfelt thank you to each and every one of you regarding the funeral of my mum. The dignity and respect shown was heart-warming. From bowing to my mum, to the horses and their perfect plumes and also the video tribute was beautiful. All in all it was absolutely perfect and dignified from start to finish.”